Fall Winter 2013

02March

Streetsville supports Sledge Hockey Paralympian Kevin Rempel

LADNER'S is proud to help out paralympian Kevin Rempel, who is a member of the Canadian Ice Sledge Hockey team going for gold in Sochi March 7th - 16th.
 

Kevin's amazing story was brought to our attention by customer and friend Bill Teggart who has embraced similar causes with his 'Team Teggart Heroes' series.

Kevin informed us of how important Bill's mentoring role has meant to him and aided him in climbing to such personal and athletic heights. Kevin Fitting at Ladner's

 

Please check-out the links below to learn more about Kevin and his journey to the Paralympics, it's quite an inspiring story ... help us cheer for #5 and his teammates as they battle to get to the top podium in Russia.

 

Best of luck Kevin!

   
Link to:  William J. Teggart Website Link to: Kevin Rempel Website
Link to: Kevin's Facebook Page Link to: Sochi Paralympics IPC
 

Posted in Fall Winter 2013

29November

MBOT 2013 awards of excellence

todd-at-podiumTodd Ladner receives the Sam McCallion Small Business Community Involvement Award at the 2013 Mississauga Board of Trade Gala.

The award was presented to Mr Ladner after years of volunteer work in the Community, primarily through involvement with the Board of Management at the Vic Johnston Community Centre and the Streetsville BIA. In his acceptance speech Ladner commented that he knew Sam McCallion when he was a youngster growing up in the Village and he admired and eventually emulated Sam's sense of building a strong and independent Community that offered a safe and stable environment in which to work, raise a family and volunteer with friends. This spirit of Community is alive and well in Streetsville today and Ladner encouraged the next generation to embrace a similar lifestyle wherever they may go!



 

Posted in Fall Winter 2013

26November

Buy Canadian

by Todd Ladner

Does country of origin count in the apparel industry? Of course it does!
blog-pic2We tout ‘buy Canadian’ in Ladner’s at every opportunity and work hard to establish relationships with Canadian manufacturers operating in the better end of the menswear supply chain. Most of these companies are based in the GTA and Montreal, and typically source the fabrics they work with from textile mills in Italy or eastern Europe. We look at the fabrics a season in advance along with all the other retail accounts in North America. We select the fabrics, styles and sizes we’d like to see arrive in our store at the start of our next selling cycle.

The manufacturer gets a great idea of what is selling from this big cross section of regional stores and places their fabric ‘buy’ in accordance with these selections, often buying a little more of the fabrics that have shown a lot of promise. It’s an intricate formula subject to tight European delivery windows and possible delays because of shipping problems and government regulations.

ladners-shop-1Once the fabric is in-house, the manufacturing process is a challenge onto itself, with workers’ unions balancing the owners need to keep costs low enough to make garments that are competitively priced. The finished garments are usually superior in quality to most clothing made anywhere else in the world, hence the pride in origin and the pride (and smarts) in putting dollars back into the Canadian economy by the combined commitment of manufacturers, retailers and consumers. European clothing is also of the highest standards (our German pant lines like Alberto, Meyer, Brax and Hiltl) but they are subject to shipping, tariff and duty costs that do elevate the retail price. Tough call by our feds on whether or not to lighten that burden on European importers and exporters to Canada; it opens the doors for our suppliers to push product to Europe, but they will face stiffer competition in their local marketplaces.

Our best sale is a Canadian made suit, shirt, pant, belt or tie by Coppley, Samuelsohn, Jack Victor, Cohen, Lipson, Omega, Gala, Riviera, Benchcraft or Dion. We know the quality, make and price is genuine …and we aim to please!

Posted in Fall Winter 2013

22November

Bespoke Tailoring

by Todd Ladner

In the past, made-to-measure or tailored-to-measure referred to a bespoke ordering system in which a sewing pattern was created for each part of a garment before cutting and assembling commenced. After many fittings and delivery of a new suit, these paper patterns were then stored for future use under the customer’s name. On Savile Row in London, England, some of the patterns in storage date back centuries, and are the stuff of royalty.

Posted in Fall Winter 2013

29November

Bespoke Tailoring (Copy)

by Todd Ladner

In the past, made-to-measure or tailored-to-measure referred to a bespoke ordering system in which a sewing pattern was created for each part of a garment before cutting and assembling commenced. After many fittings and delivery of a new suit, these paper patterns were then stored for future use under the customer’s name. On Savile Row in London, England, some of the patterns in storage date back centuries, and are the stuff of royalty.
Photo by SummerWithMorons
Bespoke tailoring is still available, but it typically comes with a tremendous price tag and a four-to-six week delivery term. With today’s technology, this antiquated form of manufacturing is more of a status symbol and lifestyle experience than a wardrobe necessity. At Ladner’s we now employ a tailored-to-measure ordering system that is affordable, efficient, specialized and flexible. Our Canadian suppliers provide us with a sample set of superior European milled fabrics at the beginning of each season. Once a sample is selected we discuss styling the garment to our customer’s needs. Typically this exchange will focus around a two-button jacket with a notch or peak lapel, side or centre vent(s), cuff openings and flap pocket alignment. Buttons are selected next, and often an upgraded lining pattern is then added.

The measuring process is next, with existing in-store models and fits tried on and adjustments noted. Up to 16 measurement changes are allowed to stock garments under this system and in only rare cases are full made-to-measure garments required for customers. The order is then sent to the manufacturer and the finished garment is returned in two to three weeks. Final adjustments, if required, are then done in-house by expert tailors.

Accessorizing the garments is the final step of the purchase and at Ladner’s we often repeat the custom clothing process with our Canadian shirt suppliers, ensuring an exact fit for the entire outfit. It’s these added touches that get noticed and garner compliments. New shoes, belts, neckties and pocket squares all add to the experience!

If you feel you never quite fit into stock garments correctly, consider the new form of custom tailoring available to North American customers at stores like Ladner’s. I’m betting you’ll be glad you did.

Photo by SummerWithMorons

Posted in Fall Winter 2013

03December

How does Community involvement relate to your Menswear shopping?

How does Community involvement relate to your Menswear shopping? ... possibly in a very impactful way! There are choices involved in your purchasing experience. One route is to tap into the vast pipeline of product imported from Asia and India that has recently flooded our marketplace at ridiculously low prices (how cheap and low can we go?) and is presented to customers in a warehouse outlet setting by employee's that are typically uninterested in serving their patrons, and who realistically don't have any credible knowledge about the product they're selling, and who are most likely 'job-hunting' for another vocation during their current tenure. Not a great choice, but a very popular one right now. Nobody really wins here except for the invisible manufacturer and importer.

Consider the alternative. Find a store in your Community that caters to local clientele with a thoughtful presentation of product, a staff that is engaging and knowledgeable, and product that is of better quality and perhaps even made in Canada. Their merchandise is almost guaranteed for reasonable wear from the moment you buy it, because the store is fully invested in your return business and wants to build a relationship with you and your clothing needs. The staff actually enjoy working with you and are excited to see you. This is typically a career vocation for these employees and owners. Their priority is to be the best they can be and they need to know their stuff to reach their goals, and they know they need to be on trend and value oriented. They know at all times you have other choices!

Now step back and look at this picture from a bigger viewpoint. Purchasing clothing from a Community store is really re-investing in the Community and Country you live in. The staff probably live somewhere nearby, they pay local taxes, their kids go to local schools, they volunteer for local charity events, their business is a safe and stable entity on the street ... and if the clothing they sell is made in Canada they have a large stake in the Canadian workforce. You do have choices every time you purchase your clothing. With a little thought and planning it's not difficult to make the right one!

Posted in Fall Winter 2013